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02/21/2018
Picture of Nick Burlison, Craig Dunn, Mike McGoldrick and Kim Cash

Regent Bank is excited to announce its expansion to Springfield, Missouri

Regent Bank recently announced its expansion into the Springfield, Missouri market with the hiring of several well-known local banking executives including Craig Dunn, Market President; Mike McGoldrick and Nick Burlison, Senior Vice Presidents of Commercial Lending; and Kim Cash, Director of Cash Management.

 

Regent Bank is a 120-year old community bank that was purchased by Regent Capital Corporation in April 2008.  In less than 10 years, the regional business bank has grown from $72 million to $450 million in total assets, winning many statewide and national awards along the way including ICBA Central U.S. Community Banker of the Year, SBA Financial Services Professional of the Year, Oklahoma Magazine Best of the Best, and Best Places to Work in Oklahoma.  Regent Bank employs 90 bankers at three full-service locations in Tulsa, Oklahoma City and Nowata, OK.

“We could not be more excited about entering the Springfield market with this amazing team,” - Sean Kouplen, Chairman & CEO - Regent Bank

“We could not be more excited about entering the Springfield market with this amazing team,” said Sean Kouplen, Chairman & CEO of Regent Bank, in a written statement.  “We realize Springfield has plenty of financial institutions, but we believe the business community will find Regent Bank’s brand of banking to be very personalized and unique.”

Craig Dunn, Regent Bank’s Springfield President, is a banking veteran with 25 years of commercial banking and executive experience in Missouri, most recently serving as Market President of the Springfield/Tri Lakes markets for Bear State Bank.  He graduated Cum Laude from Missouri State University in 1993, obtained his MBA from Southwest Baptist University in 1999 and completed the Graduate School of Banking in Wisconsin in 2006.   Dunn is currently Vice President of the Board of Directors for The Child Advocacy Center and is a member of Young President’s Organization.  

Dunn is very excited to join Regent Bank.  “I am so humbled by this opportunity,” he said.  “Regent Bank has seen extraordinary growth the last few years.  The bank has an amazing corporate culture and I love their commitment to the communities they serve.  This really is a dream come true for me and our team, and we have very exciting plans for this market.”

“Craig and his team are tremendous bankers and we feel very blessed to have them join our team,” said Kouplen.  “Our goal is simply to support them and let them do their job.  Regent Bank’s lending limit to an individual client is just over $12 million and growing, and we focus on minimizing bureaucracy so we can be responsive to our clients.   We have also invested heavily in technology so you never have to come to the bank unless you want to.”

Regent Bank has familiarity with the Springfield market, as several local business leaders joined the bank as investors back in 2008 when Regent Capital Corporation purchased the bank.  Chuck Woolley, a former Fortune 500 executive who is affiliated with the Kingsley Group, has been a member of Regent Bank’s Board of Directors for over 7 years.

“Regent Bank is very innovative,” said Woolley.  “The bank has averaged 35% annual asset growth in the past five years- almost 10 times the national average.  We focus heavily on assisting our clients through proprietary programs such as the Executive Luncheon Series and Regent Elite.  We also recently launched specialty banking divisions to better serve medical and non-profit organizations.  I really believe Regent Bank will be an excellent addition to our community. 

The bank is also unique in its ownership structure.  “We are owned by business owners and we were created for business owners,” said Kouplen.  “Regent Bank is owned by 180 entrepreneurs throughout the region, so we understand the issues business owners face every day.  We partner with our clients and stand by them.”

The bank is also unusual in its focus on faith.  They host a monthly breakfast in Tulsa called Faith in Business, which is attended by hundreds of local business leaders.  Kouplen leads a daily conference call devotional with thousands of attendees from all over the country.  “We never want to force our faith on anyone,” said Kouplen. “But, we are open about our beliefs and the tremendous blessings we have been given.”

Dunn and his Springfield team will be moving into the former Regions Bank location at 3271 East Battlefield Road by mid-April.  While the facility is being renovated, they will work from a temporary office at 3556 South Culpepper Circle, Suite 1. 

Contact Information:

Craig Dunn, Market President
cdunn@regent.bank
417.860.8807

Mike McGoldrick, Commercial Lending
mmcgoldrick@regent.bank
417.818.1444

Nick Burlison, Commercial Lending
nburlison@regent.bank
417.861.9724

Kim Cash, Director of Cash Management
kcash@regent.bank
417.827.9640


Temporary Office (until May 1):

3556 South Culpepper Circle, Suite 1

Permanent Office (After May 1):

3271 East Battlefield Road

 

02/25/2018
Downtown Tulsa on Fifth and Main

Long an energy hub, Tulsa is a financial industry leader, too. 

Tulsa World - Feb 25, 2018 

(Read Entire Article Here)

...Not all of Tulsa’s banks are big. The city is a haven for small banks, too.

One of the big benefits of doing business in Tulsa is the low cost of doing business, said Regent Bank CEO Sean Kouplen.

He said the bank feels like the city has a tremendous amount of momentum given the influx of development it’s seeing downtown.

Kouplen said Regent has decided to expand in Tulsa and will add 20 new jobs this calendar year, adding to an employee base of 85 that’s doubled since the bank was purchased in 2008.

“They’re (Tulsans are) hardworking, honest people, entrepreneurial. We just click with this community. That’s why we’ve made it our home and chose it as our community,” Kouplen said.

03/09/2018

The Bottle Neck is at the Top of the Bottle

by Sean Kouplen, Chairman & CEO - Regent Bank (3/9/18)

Bottleneck, log jam, high center.  There are many metaphors for things not moving forward.  We’ve all been there, and once you realize it’s happened, you immediately start looking for ways to get un-stuck.  Unfortunately, many times, the bottleneck is caused by you and I as leaders.

While there are many ways that organizations get stuck, it is often the natural result of the organization outgrowing whatever systems, resources or people that got them to where they are.  In Traction (the management operating system we use), Gino Wickman identifies five core leadership abilities that the leaders of every growing business must master in order to break through whenever they get stuck.  They are Simplify, Delegate, Predict, Systemize and Structure.

We all have gifts and the very special gifts of entrepreneurs create new business and opportunities.  At some point, however, the entrepreneur simply takes on too much.  We must hand off certain functions to others so that we can re-focus back to what we do best.  The issue is when we try to hold on to too much and we won’t let go of some things, we become the bottleneck.  We all reach a point where we just can’t do it all.

There are lots of reasons we leaders do this, some even sound noble.  “I wouldn’t ask my people to do anything that I wouldn’t do.  It’s quicker to just do it myself.  It takes too long to train them.  The list goes on and on. 

In How To Be A Great Boss, Wickham and our friend Rene’ Boer explain a simple yet powerful tool called Delegate and Elevate™.  Here is how it works.:

  1. Track everything you do over the next week or two. 
  2. Then place each task in one of four quadrants:
    1. Love to do / Great at;
    2. Like to do / Good At;
    3. Don’t like / but Good at;
    4. Don’t like / Not Good
  1. Now begin to delegate things in areas c and d (things we don’t like and aren’t good at).

You will be amazed at how much more productive you will be, and your team will thank you.  Productivity will go up, people will learn new skills and things will get flowing again. 

To download the FREE “How to be a Great Boss” toolkit that includes Delegate and Elevate plus seven other powerful people tools, go to www.BeAGreatBoss.com